Germany Pictures

Saturday, August 13, 2005

The large images are now reasonable size ... enjoy!

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Before embarking on a day of sightseeing, one must obtain the proper rest. Daisy was demonstrating that here.


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A tower in Rüsheim


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A view of Rüsheim.


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Daisy wants to see what's going on. She was very popular with the kids on the boat.


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A church that caught our eye from the boat.


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Burg Klopp in Bingen was first mentioned in 1282, was destroyed in 1689, the remains demolished (that's just spiteful) in 1713. Keep and gatehouse were rebuilt around 1855, and the rest of the castle was rebuilt 1875-1879.


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Double it and add 30, it was about 64 degrees Fahrenheit.


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We love the vineyards! In the upper right, you can see the Niederwalddenkmal.


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Ehrenfels Castle Ruin was built circa 1211, and destroyed by the French in 1689.


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The Mauseturm, or Mouse Tower. The following is from "The Rhine, from Mainz to Cologne." According to legend, the tower was built by an Archbishop of Mainz called Hatto to fleece Rhein bargees. Peasants were levied the corn tithe, which he collected in a huge barn at Mainz. Following a bad harvest, the hungry rural population came to Mainz and asked for grain. This Hatto promised the petitioners, whom he sent to the tithe barn. Here he had them locked up, and he is said to have set fire personally to the wooden structure. All of the captives perished. Only the mice escaped. They invaded the palace and gobbled up everything edible. Then, Hatto recalled the tower on the Rhein islet, where he hoped he would be safe from the rodents. But when he reached Bingen to be ferried across, the mice were waiting for him. They swam after the boat, and many reached the tower, where they attacked Hatto and ate him alive. In fact, this "Mauseturm" (Mice Tower) was for centuries the "Mautturm" (Toll Tower) of the Electors of Mainz, and popular imagination did the rest. It was burned down by the French in 1689, but restored by the King of Prussia in 1855 to be used as a signal tower for the narrow shipping passage, a function the structure retained until 1974, when the channel was again deepened. Since then, the Mauseturm has been inhabited by bats and legends.


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This is a guesthouse and restaurant. Nice view!


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Rheinstein Castle in Trechtinghausen was built on a precipitous rock 90 meters above the Rhein. It was built circa 900, and by 1282 was used by Rudolf von Habsburg who sat in judgment against insubordinate knights of the Rhein. By the 17th century it had fallen into disrepair. The ruin was purchased in 1823 by Prince Frederich Ludwig of Prussia who turned it into a summer home. Nice. It is currently owned by the former opera singer Hermann Hecher who has restored the castle and its interior to its former glory.


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Some scenes of Assmannhausen, pronounced AHZ-mun-How-zen. For all of the wine made along the Rhein, this is the only area that grows grapes for red wine.


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For the Seinfeld fans in the house.


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Another picture of Rheinstein Castle.


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There are so many castles on the Rhein, and I can't find this one in my book. But it looks really cool, right?


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This train was so incredibly long, I couldn't have captured the whole thing if I had a panoramic camera.


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Reichenstein Castle was probably built in the 11th century, and destroyed in 1254, razed again in 1282. It was rebuilt in 1344, and fell into disrepair 200 years later. It was purchased in 1834, and rebuilt in 1899.


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A quarry


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Sooneck Castle in Niederheimbach was originally built in the 11th century, and it was destroyed in 1253, and further destroyed in 1282. That's just mean. It was rebuilt for the Mainz electors in circa 1350, and destroyed again in 1689, and I'm quoting my book now, 'probably by the French.' The ruin was purchased in 1825 by the Crown Prince and later King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia, who had it rebuilt as a hunting lodge in 1834.


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The rock is moved from the quarry directly to the ships.


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We love the row houses along the Rhein.


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Heimburg Castle was completed in 1305, and was ceded to the archbishop in 1344. It was used as the residence of officials, then fell into disrepair by the 16th century. The Stinnes family acquired the ruin in the 19th century and renovated part of it. Today it is in private ownership and is used by the owners as their home.


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Heimburg Castle overlooking Niederheimbach.


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Furstenberg Castle in Rheindiebach was constructed in 1219. The castle's builder died suddenly in 1225, and the structure was aquired by the Bavarians in 1243. In 1410 it became part of the Kurpfalz domain. During the Thirty Years' War, it was taken by the Spanish in 1620, again by the Swedes in 1632, and blown up by the French in 1689 (except for the tower). Today it is private property, operated as a wine cellar.


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A cemetery


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Pfalzgrafenstein Castle's protective wall was built in 1338-42, and the bastion at the southern end and the interior arcades in 1607. In 1793 the German army under Colonel Szekuly crossed the Rhein here, and the famous General Blucher did the same in 1814. This castle was never taken. The strong current of the river here made the castle impregnable.


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Kim was kind enough to donate this picture of us.


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And let's not forget Daisy! Or as her parents call her, "Puppa Grrl."


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My camera stopped working, so the balance of these were taken with Kim's camera. She's a sweetie.


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This castle is not in either of my books.


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The entrance to a train tunnel.


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Loreley Rock. According to legend, Loreley (Lorelei) was a beautiful young woman who threw herself into the Rhein in despair over a faithless lover. Transformed into a siren, she sat on the rock combing her long, blonde hair and taking out her revenge by luring fishermen and ship captains to their destruction.


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On the train with Puppa-Grrl.


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The Rathaus in Wiesbaden during Weinfest (Wine Fest).


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