Health Information

To contact the Health Services Office:

  • Suzanne Wilson, RN, BS,
    Coordinator of College Health Services
    M-203, Auburn Campus
    197 Franklin Street
    Auburn, NY 13021
    Phone: 315-255-1743, ext. 2203
    Fax: 315-253-0063 wilson@cayuga-cc.edu

The Health Services Office is staffed at both campuses and open Monday through Friday. A registered nurse is available to discuss your health concerns and assist you with your immunization requirements. A variety of services are offered, including:

  • First aid and assistance with illness
  • Medical referrals as needed and appropriate
  • Detailed information regarding immunization requirements as required by New York State Public Health Law
  • Processing of insurance claim forms, medical bills, and medicine receipts for accident or illness
  • Tuberculosis skin testing for Nursing and Early Childhood students
  • Notes regarding health absences when requested by students for instructors
  • Immunization transcripts
  • Free health information brochures
  • Smoking cessation information and referrals (visit the NYS Smokers’ Quitsite at www.nysmokefree.com)
  • Health education programs
  • Blood pressure screening

Accident insurance is required for all full-time students.

Health insurance is non-mandatory and available to all part-time and full-time students. Enrollment is based on a forced survey supplied through your MyCayuga/Banner account. The survey will ask all students if they wish to get Health Insurance for the semester at the charge of $152.50 per semester. By answering yes, this charge will be applied to their account and will be due when tuition is due. By answering no, there will be no charge and a waiver will be recorded.

Student insurance claim forms are available in the Health Office on both campuses or visit www.studentplanscenter.com. For insurance information and verification, call the Health Office.

Cassandra A. Archer, M.D., is the College’s physician. If you choose to see Dr. Archer regarding a physical exam, illness, or meningitis vaccine, she is available by appointment at 315-255-0947. You may call the office directly, or contact the Health Services Office in Auburn.

 

Immunization Requirements

New York State Public Health Law 2165 requires all college students, 6 credit hours or more on campus, born in 1957 or later, to provide proof of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella.

This is what you need to provide:

Measles (Rubeola) requires TWO dates of immunization. Both dates must be given after 1967 and no more than four days before your first birthday. Measles immunizations given in 1967 or before may be accepted if a live vaccine was used. A positive measles titer (blood test) or a disease statement from the diagnosing physician also constitutes valid proof of immunity.

Rubella (German Measles) requires one date of immunization, no more than four days before your first birthday. A positive rubella titer (blood test) is also an acceptable proof of immunity in lieu of the immunization date.

Mumps requires one date of immunization, no more than four days before your first birthday. A positive mumps titer (blood test) or a disease statement from the diagnosing physician also constitutes valid proof of immunity.

You can obtain this information from your physician, high school record, former college, baby immunization record book, or military record.

If you have a valid medical reason for not complying with this law, please let the Health Office know. Your physician will need to sign a medical waiver form for you. An exemption for religious belief is also available, and must be approved by the Health Office.

New York State Public Health Law 2167 requires colleges to distribute information about meningococcal disease and vaccinations to ALL students taking 6 credit hours or more on campus.

It is your responsibility to sign and return the Meningococcal Meningitis Vaccination Response Form or to complete the form electronically in MyCayuga. Students 18 years old and older must sign the form. A parent or guardian must legally sign the form for any student under 18.

These laws allow a 30-day grace period for you to become compliant. After the 30-day grace period, you will be restricted from class attendance. You may resume classes as soon as you are compliant with these laws. Financial aid and final grades will be withheld and no further registration allowed until you have met New York State requirements.

Any concerns or questions should be directed to the Health Office on the Auburn Campus, 315-255-1743, ext. 2203; 315-592-4143, ext. 2203; Fax 315-253-0063. All forms are available at the Health Office and on the health office web page, or can be mailed upon request.

 

Meningococcal Letter

Dear Student or Parent/Guardian (for Student under the age of 18):

Meningococcal disease is a potentially fatal bacterial infection commonly referred to as meningitis. New York State has a Public Health Law (NYS PHL) ξ2167 that requires colleges and universities to distribute information about meningococcal disease and vaccination to all students meeting the enrollment criteria, whether they live on or off campus.

Cayuga Community College is required by law to send you the enclosed information. It is then your responsibility to sign and return the Meningococcal Meningitis Vaccination Response Form or to complete the form electronically in MyCayuga/Banner. Students 18 years old and older must sign the form. A parent or guardian must legally sign this paper for any student under 18.

You can fill out this form by:

  1. Documenting you’ve had the meningococcal meningitis immunization within the past 10 years and provide the date. [Note: If you (or your child) received the meningococcal vaccine available before February 2005 called MenomuneTM, please note this vaccine's protection lasts for approximately three to five years. Revaccination with the new conjugate vaccine called MenactraTM should be considered within three to five years after receiving MenomuneTM.]                     OR
  2. Acknowledging receipt of information regarding meningococcal disease risks and your declination of meningococcal meningitis immunization at this time. This declination must be signed by the student or the parent/guardian for those under 18.

Meningitis is rare. However, when it strikes, its flu-like symptoms make diagnosis difficult. If not treated early, meningitis can lead to swelling of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal column as well as severe and permanent disabilities, such as hearing loss, brain damage, seizures, limb amputation, and even death.

Cases of meningitis among teens and young adults 15 to 24 years of age (the age of most college students) have more than doubles since 1991. The disease strikes about 2,500 Americans each year and claims about 300 lives. Between 100 and 125 meningitis cases occur on college campuses, and as many as 15 students will die from the disease.

In February 2005, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended a new vaccine, known as MenactraTM, for use to prevent meningococcal disease. The previous version of this vaccine, MenomuneTM, is still recommended for children less than 11 years old. Both vaccines are 85 to 100 percent effective in preventing four kinds of the meningococcus germ (types A, C, Y, W-135). These four types cause about 70 percent of the disease in the United States. Because the vaccine does not include Type B, which accounts for about one-third of cases in adolescents, it does not prevent all cases of meningococcal disease.

You can receive this vaccine from your own health care provider. The Health Office at Cayuga Community College will not offer the meningitis vaccine. However, it will be available at Dr. Cassandra Archer’s office at 37 W. Garden St., Auburn, by appointment only. The cost is approximately $100 per dose. Dr. Archer’s phone number is 315-255-0947.

The Health Office encourages you (and your child) to carefully review the enclosed materials. Please complete the Meningococcal Meningitis Response Form and return it to the Health Office at Cayuga Community College or submit electronically in MyCayuga/Banner. Please submit the form as soon as possible.

NOTE: PER PUBLIC HEALTH LAW, NO INSTITUTION SHOULD PERMIT ANY STUDENT TO ATTEND THE INSTITUTION IN EXCESS OF 30 DAYS WITHOUT COMPLYING WITH THIS LAW.

To learn more about meningitis and the vaccine, please feel free to contact our health service and/or consult your (child’s) physician.

You can also find information about the disease at the:

College Health Services
Cayuga Community College
197 Franklin Street
Auburn, NY 13021-3099
315-255-1743, ext. 2203/2249
315-592-4143, ext. 2203/3008
Fax: 315-253-0063

 

Meningococcal Fact Sheet

New York State Department of Health Meningococcal Disease
Last Reviewed: November 2006

What is meningococcal disease?

Meningococcal disease is a severe bacterial infection of the bloodstream or meninges (a thin lining covering the brain and spinal cord) caused by the meningococcus germ.

Who gets meningococcal disease?

Anyone can get meningococcal disease, but it is more common in infants and children. For some adolescents, such as first-year college students living in dormitories, there is an increased risk of meningococcal disease. Every year in the United States approximately 2,500 people are infected and 300 die from the disease. Other persons at increased risk include household contacts of a person known to have had this disease, immunocompromised people, and people traveling to parts of the world where meningococcal meningitis is prevalent.

How is the meningococcus germ spread?

The meningococcus germ is spread by direct close contact with nose or throat discharges of an infected person.

What are the symptoms?

High fever, headache, vomiting, stiff neck and a rash are symptoms of meningococcal disease. The symptoms may appear two to 10 days after exposure, but usually within five days. Among people who develop meningococcal disease, 10 to 15 percent die, in spite of treatment with antibiotics. Of those who live, permanent brain damage, hearing loss, kidney failure, loss of arms or legs, or chronic nervous system problems can occur.

What is the treatment for meningococcal disease?

Antibiotics, such as penicillin G or ceftriaxone, can be used to treat people with meningococcal disease.

Should people who have been in contact with a diagnosed case of meningococcal meningitis be treated?

Only people who have been in close contact (household members, intimate contacts, health care personnel performing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, daycare center playmates, etc.) need to be considered for preventive treatment. Such people are usually advised to obtain a prescription for a special antibiotic (either rifampin, ciprofloxacin or ceftriaxone) from their physician. Casual contact, as might occur in a regular classroom, office or factory setting, is not usually significant enough to cause concern.

Is there a vaccine to prevent meningococcal meningitis?

In February 2005 the CDC recommended a new vaccine, known as MenactraTM, for use to prevent meningococcal disease in people 11 to 55 years of age. The previously licensed version of this vaccine, MenomuneTM, is available for children two to 10 years old and adults older than 55 years. Both vaccines are 85

to 100 percent effective in preventing the four kinds of the meningococcus germ (types A, C, Y, W-135). These four types cause about 70 percent of the disease in the United States. Because the vaccines do not include type B, which accounts for about one-third of cases in adolescents, they do not prevent all cases of meningococcal disease.

Is the vaccine safe? Are there adverse side effects to the vaccine?

Both vaccines are currently available and both are safe and effective vaccines. However, both vaccines may cause mild and infrequent side effects, such as redness and pain at the injection site lasting up to two days.

Who should get the meningococcal vaccine?

The vaccine is recommended for all adolescents entering middle school (11 to 12 years old) and high school (15 years old), and all first-year college students living in dormitories. However, the vaccine will benefit all teenagers and young adults in the United States. Also at increased risk are people with terminal complement deficiencies or asplenia, some laboratory workers and travelers to endemic areas of the world.

What is the duration of protection from the vaccine?

MenomuneTM, the older vaccine, requires booster doses every three to five years. Although research is still pending, the new vaccine, MenactraTM, will probably not require booster doses.

How do I get more information about meningococcal disease and vaccination?

Contact your physician or your student health service. Additional information is also available on the web sites of the New York State Department of Health, www.nyhealth.gov; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/; and the American College Health Association, www.acha.org.

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