“One Day” Published

July 24, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Creative Writing 

Postcard Shorts

Postcard Shorts: Stories that Fit on a Postcard.

A flash fiction story of mine published today.

Take a look. Tell me what you think.

Build Your Game Design Skills

January 31, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Creative Writing, New Media, Video games 

D3 Logo

 DESIGN                                                             For Cayuga students who share

 DEVELOP                                                           a common interest and curiosity in

 DEPLOY                                                             videogame design and development

D3 Interactive invites students to undertake five secret missions in Spring 2012.  Agents, who choose to accept these challenges, will participate collaboratively to level up their design skills.  No coding or design experience required.

Missions include…

  • (Feb 6)—Working Your Game Core
  • (Feb 20)—Taming War without Frontiers
  • (Mar 5)—Uncovering Passwords to Lost Enigmas
  • (Mar 19)—Melting Digital Metal into Physical Gold
  • (Apr 2)—Raising the Dead

Secret Missions

Drop by L-218 and talk with Professor Bower to receive your missions.

www.cayugagames.wikispaces.com

CCCC Report on Writing Majors at a Glance

The NCTE committee charged with compiling information on undergraduate writing majors has completed its report.  In sum, the CCCC article explaining the results observes there are two types of undergraduate writing majors depending on the college: Liberal Arts or Professional/Rhetorical; the former is founded in creative writing and literature, the latter in writing theory and praxis (418).  Nationally, the writing major is growing with 68 degrees at 65 unique schools documented.  Most are housed in English departments and are either quite flexible and/or interdisciplinary degrees.  Candidates are encouraged to double major.  None of this should is a surprise.  What is interesting, however, is where these points coincide in principle with Cayuga’s own writing concentration.  At Cayuga, many liberal students are interested in creative writing, and professional writing courses are linked to other majors such as business, mechanical tech, computer information, or telecommunications.  This difference is recognized by Cayuga students through their desire for personal-literary expression and writing that gets-things-done.

Overall, two curricular recommendations were made:

  1. The Writing Major might include a foundations/ introductory course such as those found in psychology, sociology, etc.
  2. The bachelors degree should have a capstone experience–i.e. a portfolio, internship, or other experience through which students might draw together and/or apply what they’ve learned about writing.

Finally, it was suggested more rhetorical history and research methods instruction be included in undergraduate writing studies.  Cayuga is addressing these concerns in several ways.  An honors English 101 has been offered successfully that focuses on an Introduction to Writing Studies (rhetoric and composition); plans are in process to offer such designated 101’s in the future.  Professional Writing, a new writing concentration course with an experiential component, will be offered Fall 2010.  Several new one-credit English 238 courses are scheduled for Fall 2010, one on Written (Rhetorical) Invention, another a revision workshop that would help a student’s writing portfolio for transfer or prospective interviews.  In total, Cayuga is making several steps toward meeting the recommendations in the CCCC Report on Writing Majors and looks forwards to continuing to offer a very reasonably affordable education for those interested in writing for careers and transfer.